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PART 1

STRAW ROCKET

SCOUT OATH & LAW

WELCOME TO PART 1 OF THE CUB SCOUT FREE TRIAL!

Each part of the Cub Scout free trial will offer a fun and exciting at-home activity, but also help you earn
your first Cub Scout Badge - the Bobcat Badge! You can complete each part of the free trial in an
afternoon or over time! As a reminder, you can sign up at any point in time to join a Cub Scout Pack
in your area. 

Today we are going to build and launch straw rockets to see how far they go! Can you design your rocket
differently each time to launch it farther? We will then learn about the Scout Oath and Law. The words we
say in the Scout Oath and Law are the guiding principles not only of Scouting, but of how we as Scouts strive to
act every single day. Take some time to really think about the words as you say them. Think about their meaning and
how you could try to follow these ideas each day.

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STRAW ROCKETS

Straw Rockets are an excellent opportunity for youth to practice the engineering design process. This activity provides a template that creates a rocket that can be launched from a soda straw. Challenge yourself to modify the design to see how the changes impact the rocket performance. Length, fin shape or angle can be changed–one variable at a time–to see how the rocket launch performs, and compares to the control design.

MATERIALS NEEDED

PROCEDURE

  1. Carefully cut out the large rectangle on the rocket template. This will be the body of the rocket. Then wrap the rocket body around a pencil length-wise and tape it closed to form a tube.
     

  2. Carefully cut out the two fin units. Align the rectangle in the middle of the fin with the end of the rocket body, and tape it to the rocket body. Nothing should stick out past the bottom of the rocket body.
     

  3. Do the same thing for the other fin, but tape it on the other side of the pencil to make a “fin sandwich.”
     

  4. Bend the part of the fin that looks like a triangle 90 degrees so that each fin is at a right angle to its neighbor. Looking at the bottom of the rocket, the fins should look like a +.
     

  5. Twist and pinch the top of the rocket body around the tip of the pencil to create a "nose cone" for the rocket. Tape the nose cone to prevent air from escaping and to keep it from untwisting.
     

  6. Measure the nose cone from its base (right where it starts to narrow) to its tip, and record the length in their data log and on the rocket itself. (Once completed, the rocket will be about 13 cm (about 5 in) tall.
     

  7. Remove the pencil and replace it with the soda straw.
     

  8. In the designated launch area, away from people and other hazards, blow into the straw to launch your rocket.
     

  9. Use the meter stick/yard stick/measuring tape to measure the distance it travels, then record the distance on your data log.
     

  10. Can you make your rocket fly farther? Make new rockets by altering the template. Try different rocket lengths, fin shapes, fin sizes, or fin angles. Repeat steps 6 and 9 for every launch, recording each design change and distance in your data log. Make only one change at a time, so you will know which design changes result in changes in performance.

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BACKGROUND

Modern rocket design began near the beginning of the 20th century. While much has been learned and rockets have grown larger and more powerful, rocket designs are still improving. Engineers developing new rockets must control variables and consider failure points when improving rocket designs. By changing one variable at a time, engineers can determine if that change leads to an increase or decrease in performance. They must also consider how their design might fail, and work to improve their design. These incremental changes allow engineers to improve rocket performance and increase the amount of mass they can lift into space.

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Other Cub Scouts making straw rockets!

Share your free trial photos by tagging @BuckeyeCouncil on Facebook/Instagram or using #HomeScouting or #BuckeyeCouncil on Instagram! Find a collection of Cub Scouts participating in Buckeye Council's HomeScouting Adventures here

LEARN THE SCOUT OATH & LAW

Let’s start out on the trail of your Cub Scout adventures by learning what it takes to become a Bobcat. One of the most important steps is to understand that all Scouts believe in, live by, and often repeat the Scout Oath and the Scout Law. We learn those words and believe in them as a way to live our lives and be good members of our families, our communities, and the Cub Scout Pack.

SCOUT OATH

On my honor I will do my best

to do my duty to God and my country

and to obey the Scout Law;

to help other people at all times;

to keep myself physically strong,

mentally awake, and morally straight.

The Meaning of the Scout Oath 

The Scout Oath has several parts. Let's look at what they mean.

ON MY HONOR

Saying “On my honor” is like saying “I promise.”

 

I WILL DO MY BEST

It means that you will do your best to do what the Scout Oath says.

TO DO MY DUTY

A duty is something you are expected to do. At home, you might be expected to make up
your bed or take out the trash. You also have duties to God and to your country.

TO GOD

You do your duty to God by following the teachings of your family and religious leaders.

 

AND MY COUNTRY

A You do your duty to your country by being a good citizen and obeying the law.

AND TO OBEY THE SCOUT LAW

You also promise to live by the 12 points of the Scout Law, which will be discussed next.

TO HELP OTHER PEOPLE AT ALL TIMES

Many people need help. A friendly smile and a helping hand make life easier for others. By helping other people, you are doing a Good Turn and making our world a better place.

 

TO KEEP MYSELF PHYSICALLY STRONG,

The last part of the Scout Oath is about taking care of yourself. You stay physically strong when you eat the right foods and get plenty of exercise.


MENTALLY AWAKE,
You stay mentally awake when you work hard in school, learn all you can, and ask questions.

AND MORALLY STRAIGHT

You stay morally straight when you do the right thing and live your life with honesty.

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SCOUT LAW

A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent

The Meaning of the Scout Law

The Scout Law has 12 points. Each is a goal for every Scout. A Scout tries to live up to the Law every day. It is not always easy to do, but a Scout always tries.

A Scout is:

TRUSTWORTHY.

Tell the truth and keep promises. People can depend on you.

LOYAL. 

Show that you care about your family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and country.

HELPFUL. 

Volunteer to help others without expecting a reward.

FRIENDLY. 

Be a friend to everyone, even people who are very different from you.

COURTEOUS. 

Be polite to everyone and always use good manners.

KIND. 

Treat others as you want to be treated. Never harm or kill any living thing without good reason.

OBEDIENT. 

Follow the rules of your family, school, and pack. Obey the laws of your community and country.

CHEERFUL. 

Look for the bright side of life. Cheerfully do tasks that come your way. Try to help others be happy.

THRIFTY. 

Work to pay your own way. Try not to be wasteful. Use time, food, supplies, and natural resources wisely.

BRAVE. 

Face difficult situations even when you feel afraid. Do what you think is right despite what others might be doing or saying.

CLEAN. 

Keep your body and mind fit. Help keep your home and community clean.

REVERENT. 

Be reverent toward God. Be faithful in your religious duties. Respect the beliefs of others.

GO TO THE NEXT ADVENTURE

YOU ARE HERE

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