Snowy Mountains

What is Cyber Sled Race?

Expanding on our virtual programs like Cyber Summer Camp Survive the Summer, and the HomeScouting Adventure Club, Buckeye Council, Boy Scouts of America has created a Cyber Sled Race that launches on December 5, 2020. This allows families to continue to enjoy scouting from the comfort of their home. Content will be released on December 5th and available all winter long to allow flexibility and can be completed at your own pace.

Cyber Sled Race Continues Through February!

The Race Map

The virtual race map will be the hub for Cyber Sled Race with different areas just like an actual sled race! Content is available all winter long for those looking for a flexible schedule. 

ANCHORAGE – START LINE

Start at Anchorage! Here you will find the all of the tracking tools, worksheets,
and your guide to navigate the Race Course for Cyber Sled Race.

FINGER LAKE - PIONEER POINT

Knots and lashings are formed today the same ways they have been done for

a long time. Build structures out of sticks and rope at Pioneer Point.

ROHN - STEM STATION

At Rohn, you’ll find an abundance of STEM experiments that are both fun
and educational.

RUBY - SURVIVAL SHACK

Learn all about basic first aid, pocket knife safety, and cold weather survival at the Survival Shack.

KALTAG - LUNCH BREAK

Prepare your lunch the same way you would along the Iditarod Trail!

SHAKTOOLIK - WEBINAR WAYPOINT

Watch an exclusive webinar with Iditarod Racer and Eagle Scout, Matthew Failor at Webinar Waypoint.

WHITE MOINTAIN - COMPASS COVE

Orient through the artic circle using a compass and waypoints. Prepare for an outdoor hike in the cold weather.

NOME - FINSH LINE

Find final reporting and instructions on how to win prizes, including a PlayStation 5 at the Final Frontier!

ADVANCEMENTS

In addition to fun engaging activities throughout the race, including: learning about outdoor winter cooking, building your own sled, basic and advanced knot tying, cold weather camping, Scouts will also have the chance to earn the following advancements in each category. 

Mountain Lion

Tigers in the Wild

Finding Your Way

Bear Claws

Critter Care

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Pioneering Merit Badge

Dog Care Merit Badge

AFFORDABLE

We tried to keep the cost of Cyber Sled Race low - with $25 as the base package which gets access to the digital content and a base package. The $25 package is perfect for one Scout, youth, or parent. Purchase items al la carte for additional members of your family!

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE

There will be a schedule for Cyber Sled Race for those looking for structure, however families can complete the activities at their own pace on their own time. Content will be available on the race course anytime to meet the needs of families.

frequently asked questions

 

I had access to the content earlier in the day, and now I don't. What happened?

Try clearing your browsing history, closing your browser, and coming back to homescouting.org. With so many changes made to the site daily, we believe the cache can't keep up.  

Why don't I see my order under "My Orders"?

Some individuals are having issues with their order showing up under "My Orders." That's okay! We have received your order. This is most likely due to account creation after purchasing a package. Similar as to if you order a pizza using guest checkout, the next time to go and decide to create an account it doesn’t show previous orders.

Can I navigate the Race Map on a phone or a tablet?

You can use a tablet, but we do not recommend using a cell phone. The BEST experience is on a computer. We highly recommend using a computer to participate for Cyber Sled Race. 

How long will the Cyber Sled Race content be accessible after it concludes?

The Race Map and everything on homescouting.org will be accessible for Cyber Sled Race participants until April 1, so you can complete adventures at your own pace and explore as much as you want!

Will my Scout be turning in the worksheets and/or tracking tools?

No. All worksheets and tracking tools are for your use to keep track of what's been completed. We recommend keeping them in case your unit leader wants to see what's been accomplished as proof of completion. 

How will my unit leader know what my Scout completed?

We will send a “final report” to both parents and unit leaders through gathering information from each Scout on work done on different merit badges and other advancements and email it to your unit leader. See here for an example of the email to unit leaders. We used this for all previous programs, and it was positively received from unit leaders. 

Will there be counseling sessions for the Pioneering Merit Badge?

Yes! We are committed to helping as many Scouts who need a counselor. Scouts are encouraged to find a local counselor however to have the best learning experience. 

Why can't I access anything on the Race Course?

Only account holders who have purchased a package have access to the digital content for Cyber Sled Race. If you have made a purchase and still can't access, email us at info@homescouting.org with your order number to grant access. 

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Pre-RACE Checklist

In December, the Cyber Sled Race began with thousands of families across the nation gathering to complete challenges, learn about the Iditarod, and meet Matthew Failor! Before you begin the race, below is a list of items to make sure you’re ready for the start line.

 

1. Create an Account on HomeScouting.org

  • To access the pre-race challenge and content on the virtual race course during Cyber Sled Race, make sure you create an account on HomeScouting.org.

  • To create an account, click on “Log In/Create Account” in the top right-hand corner. Then click “Sign Up” to create an account.

 

2. Complete the pre-race challenge

  • Log in to HomeScouting.org & click on pre-race challenge under Cyber Sled Race.

  • Meet Matthew Failor, Eagle Scout & Iditarod Racer and his dogs!

  • Follow the instructions to build a sled at home

  • Submit your entry for points for the overall challenge

 

3. Learn about the virtual race course

  • This guidebook provides an overview on what to expect in the virtual race course and how you’ll access digital content released each day through homescouting.org.

 

4. Gather supplies

  • This guidebook provides details based on your program level or rank in Cub Scouts on the materials you’ll need to complete activities. Most of the materials are household items, but to complete some activities you might need to purchase additional supplies. 

The Race Map

The virtual race map will be the hub for Cyber Sled Race with different areas just like an actual sled race! Content will be available anytime after it's published for those looking for a flexible schedule. 

ANCHORAGE – START LINE

Start at Anchorage! Here you will find the all of the tracking tools, worksheets,
and your guide to navigate the Race Course for Cyber Sled Race.

FINGER LAKE - PIONEER POINT

Knots and lashings are formed today the same ways they have been done for

a long time. Build structures out of sticks and rope at Pioneer Point.

ROHN - STEM STATION

At Rohn, you’ll find an abundance of STEM experiments that are both fun
and educational.

RUBY - SURVIVAL SHACK

Learn all about basic first aid, pocket knife safety, and cold weather survival at the Survival Shack.

KALTAG - LUNCH BREAK

Prepare your lunch the same way you would along the Iditarod Trail!

SHAKTOOLIK - WEBINAR WAYPOINT

Watch an exclusive webinar with Iditarod Racer and Eagle Scout, Matthew Failor at Webinar Waypoint.

WHITE MOINTAIN - COMPASS COVE

Orient through the artic circle using a compass and waypoints. Prepare for an outdoor hike in the cold weather.

NOME - FINSH LINE

Find final reporting and instructions on how to win prizes, including a PlayStation 5 at the Final Frontier!

MATERIALS NEEDED

To fully complete the advancement connected to Cyber Sled Race, you will need to gather the following materials prior to the event. NOTE: There might be additional materials needed for other activities for Cyber Sled Race, but they are additional and not needed to complete the rank-specific advancements.

FOR ALL SCOUTS (KIDS AGES 5-20)

  • Pencils / Pens

  • Paper

  • Glue

  • Tape

CUB SCOUTS (kids in elementary school)

for all cub scouts

Cub Scout Six Essentials

  • First Aid Kit*

  • Water Bottle*

  • Flashlight*

  • Trail Food

  • Sun Protection

  • Whistle*

LION RANK (kids in kindergarten)

Mountain Lion

  • Cub Scout Six Essentials

TIGER RANK (kids in 1st grade)

Tigers in the Wild

  • Cub Scout Six Essentials

WOLF RANK (kids in 2nd grade)

Finding Your Way

  • Map of your city/town that includes your house on it

  • Compass

BEAR RANK (kids in 3rd grade)

Bear Claws

  • Pocket Knife

  • Bar of Soap

  • 1 or 2 orangewood sticks (used for manicures) or pencil / toothpick

 

Critter Care

  • Poster Board

WEBELOS & ARROW OF LIGHT RANK

(kids in 4th & 5th grade)

First Responder

  • First Aid Kit

Castaway

  • Materials to cook two recipes that do not require pots/pans. See below for sample recipes:

    • Breakfast in a Bag

      • Bacon

      • Egg(s)

      • 1 brown paper lunch bag

      • 1 stick to hold over a fire

    • Campfire Cake in an Orange

      • At least 1 orange

      • Cake Mix (plus required ingredients)

      • Aluminum foul

    • Mud Burgers

      • Potato

      • Ground beef

      • Chopped onion

      • Aluminum Foil

    • Salt & Pepper

  • Materials to light a fire without using matches OR tree limbs/branches to build a shelter

    • Fire Building:

      • Tinder, Kindling, Fuel

      • Magnifying Glass, Flint & Steel*, or a Fire by Friction kit

    • Shelter Building:

      • Tree limbs/branches that have already fallen

      • Leaves

      • Tarp

All items with a * are available in the HomeScouting store

SCOUTS BSA MERIT BADGES & VENTURING EXPLORATIONS

(kids in middle in high school)

FOR ALL SCOUTS BSA YOUTH & VENTURERS

Scout Essentials

  • Pocket Knife*

  • First Aid Kit*

  • Extra Clothing

  • Rain Gear

  • Water Bottle*

  • Flashlight*

  • Trail Food

  • Matches & Fire Starters*

  • Sun Protection

  • Compass

PIONEERING MERIT BADGE

  • Various lengths and types of rope

  • At least 5 feet of cord to whip a rope

  • 40-foot length of 1/4 or 3/8-inch rope to throw and coil

  • Materials to Make a Rope Maker or Rope Spinner. See Below. 

Making A Rope Spinner

You will need to use a coping saw to make your rope spinner. To make a cutout in a

piece of wood, first bore a hole, 1⁄4 inch or larger, just inside the shape you want to

cut out. Remove the blade of the coping saw, slip the blade through the bored hole,

and replace the blade in the saw frame. With the blade thus “inside” the wood,

saw along the cutting line. Use the coping saw only under direct supervision of a

knowledgeable adult.

Using binder twine instead of cactus fibers, Scouts today can make rope the same way. To make a rope spinner, start with a 12-inch piece of 2-by-4-inch construction lumber. The sides of the spinner are tapered to produce a shape with more weight at the bottom to aid in spinning. The knob at the top is shaped to hold twine and strands in place.

  1. Draw the outline of the spinner on the face of the wood, then cut it out using a coping saw.

  2. Drill a 7⁄16-inch-diameter hole, positioning it 2 inches from the top of the spinner. The hole will be fitted with the handle.

  3. For a spinner handle, use a wooden dowel 3⁄8 inch in diameter and about 10 inches long. Make a stop block for the handle from a piece of wood about 3⁄4 inch square. Drill a 3⁄8-inch-diameter hole through the center of the block, and glue the dowel end into the hole.

  4. Assemble the rope spinner by slipping the handle into the hole in the spinner.

Making a Ropemaker

Farmers a hundred years ago used binder twine with their hay balers. With a

little ingenuity, those farmers devised handcranked machines to twist the twine

into rope. The pieces for the ropemaker are cut from two pieces of 3⁄4-inch-

thick plywood about 4 inches wide, one about 20 inches long and another

about 15 inches long.

 

  1. Cut piece A, the handle, to shape. (Do not drill the holes yet.)

  2. Cut pieces B and C. Glue and screw them together to form the base.

  3. Cut piece D, the separator paddle, to the same shape as the handle. (Do not cut out the notches yet.)

  4. Mark holes in the handle. First draw a 31⁄2-inch-diameter circle (13⁄4-inch radius) on the handle. The center of this circle should be 2 inches from the end of the handle. The edge of the circle will be 1⁄4 inch from each of three edges of the handle. Then, using a protractor, mark the positions of the three holes for the turning hooks. Mark the holes on the circle at 60-degree intervals—the 3 o’clock, 7 o’clock, and 11 o’clock positions.

  5. Drill the holes. Clamp the handle and the base unit together, as shown. Using a 1⁄8-inch bit, drill the three holes through both pieces of wood.

  6. Make the hooks. Cut three pieces of coat-hanger wire about 8 inches long. Use pliers to make two bends in each wire to form an L-shaped end. Each bend should be about 11⁄2 inches in length.

  7. Insert the three wires through the holes in the upright piece of the base, then bend the straight end of each wire into a hook.

  8. Notch the separator paddle. The separator paddle will be used to keep the strands separated as they are being twisted into rope. To position the notches, place the handle (A) directly on top of the paddle (D). Push a nail through the holes in the handle and press down on the nail to mark the positions on the paddle. Remove the nail. Sketch the shape of notches that will touch the nail marks on the paddle. Using a coping saw, cut out the notches.

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All items with a * are available in the HomeScouting store

You're Invited to Meet Matthew's Racing Dogs!

MEET MATT

STEP ONE

Matthew Failor is an Eagle Scout from Mansfield, OH and an Iditarod racer. He's excited to have you here during the Cyber Sled Race and begin your training mission in preparation for your race!

MEET THE DOGS

STEP TWO

Meet some of the dogs that make up Failor’s team in the videos below.

FIONN

An 8-year-old, retired member of the team. Fionn was Matt’s first dog and remains with him year-round.

UELS

A 4-year-old female and an Iditarod finisher. Uels is a hard worker and one of Matt’s most-reliable lead dogs.

TWO FACE

An 8-year-old female and a crowd-favorite. Two Face is hard-working and well-suited for any position on Matt’s team.

BADGER

An 8-year-old male with brown and blue-colored eyes that stand out in the pack. Badger is a lead dog and a previous Iditarod finisher.

COTTAGE CHEESE

A 5-year-old female whose 2014 Iditarod race was cut short due to injury. Cottage Cheese runs as if she has something to prove.

REBEL

A 2-year-old male who tends to act his age. Rebel “screams” to run fast and has a lot of potential.

COOL CAT

A 3-year-old female who is very shy. Cool Cat can run and shows leadership potential despite her young age.

BUILD

STEP THREE

Prior to modern technology and gear, mushers needed to know how to lash together logs to create sleds, shelters, and other necessary tools for the trail. Use your knowledge and household materials to design and build your own dog sled! 

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LEARN MORE

STEP FOUR

Learn more about the history of the Iditarod and how it started in Alaska. Most Scout Klondike derbies take on the theme of an Iditarod racing from city to city to earn points and win challenges. 

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RACE PACKAGE

STEP FOUR

When you sign up, your race package will ship within 24 hours of ordering. The package will include a guidebook to orient you to your digital experience. Make sure to read it and get any materials needed prior to the race! 

OVERVIEW

The dog sled, much like any other technology, has evolved over the years. For thousands of years, sleds have been used for a variety of reasons which include a means of transportation and carrying freight. 

The Inuit people have been using and building sleds for thousands of years. Aside from the common practice of using wood as a primary material, traditional Inuit sled designs have been known to include materials such as antler, bone, ivory, moss, frozen fish, and animal hides. Nowadays, sleds are certainly still designed using wood, and some people continue to use whatever materials they have at hand including some of the aforementioned. With the evolution of sled design and purpose, mushers now often use sleds that are constructed using materials which include steel, plastics, titanium, aluminum, carbon fiber and even hockey sticks. When the race first started, mushers would typically use sleds constructed primarily out of wood. 

Generally speaking, there are two types of sleds: basket sleds and toboggan sleds. Basket sleds typically have a flatbed that is raised above the runners. This area allows for items, and in some cases tired dogs, to be stored. Mushers will typically use a sled bag made out of a nylon or cordura to store their required gear. Toboggan sleds share some similarities with basket sleds; however, a significant difference is that the bed is directly mounted to the runners. 

According to Iditarod race rule 15, “A musher has a choice of sled subject to the requirement that some type of sled or toboggan must be drawn. The sled or toboggan must be capable of hauling any injured or fatigued dogs under cover, plus equipment and food.”

materials

  • Clean popsicle sticks

  • Toothpicks

  • Glue

  • Scissors

  • Pipe cleaner or piece of wire

PROCEDURE

  1. Lay two popsicle sticks down for runners. Cut two sticks in half. Then lay the two halves on each other and glue them to the runners, one on each end. Make sure to leave a small amount of space on each end. Let dry.
     

  2. Lay four sticks down in the exact middle of the runners (next to one another) as a flat base. Glue them down so that one end fits squarely and the other end sticks out over the runners. Let dry. 
     

  3. Cut four more sticks in half. Glue 5 of the halves together as shown laying the pieces on two more stick halves. This will serve as the back support. Glue one half at the very bottom of the piece and one at the top, but make sure to leave a little room at the top so the five curved tops still show. 
     

  4. Glue the piece from Step #3 on the end of the runners where the base ends squarely. 
     

  5. Glue two sticks as rails along the base. The flat part of the sticks should face sideways. Glue the tops next to the vertical piece and the bottoms next to the base. The rails should slope downward like a slide. 
     

  6. Cut toothpicks in three different heights. Make two equal sets of the toothpicks. Glue them to the side rails and runners. 
     

  7. Cut two small sections of pipe cleaner or wire and bend them as handles. 
     

  8. Glue one pipe cleaner / wire at the base of the front of the sled and one at the top for a handlebar. 

expand the challenge

Looking to expand the challenge and make a large-scale sled? ​Look no further!

Imagine you are working with a team of engineers from an engineering company that specializes in the design and manufacturing of dog-sleds. A musher has reached out to you because his current sled is not effectively carrying his gear. Your challenge is to design a sled that can effectively carry a specific weight down an inclined plane.

MATERIALS

  • cardboard

  • duct tape

  • binder clips

  • straws

  • rubber bands

  • any choice of available textile (cotton, silk, felt, etc.)

  • batteries

  • wood

  • string

  • plastic casings and frames

  • plus any other household gear you wish to use

YOUR CHALLENGE: Your sled must be able to carry at least 4 ounces for 50 feet. Additionally, your sled must be able to travel down an inclined plane and completely cross the finish line.

THE ENGINEERING PROCESS

  1. IDENTIFY THE NEED AND PROBLEM: What problem are you solving? What is your mission? What are the design requirements and constraints? What determines the success of your design(s)?
     

  2. RESEARCH THE NEED OF THE PROBLEM: Examine what you have for resources. What is your knowledge about speed, weight, effective sleds, and the potential and beneficial uses of each available design material?
     

  3. DEVELOP POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS: Brainstorm 3 possible solutions (even if the solution sounds too crazy). Evaluate the possible solutions by talking to others and asking for their opinion on reasons why it was desirable or undesirable.
     

  4. SELECT THE BEST POSSIBLE SOLUTION: Determine which solution best meets the original requirements (it might be a combination, or 1 of the 3 possible solutions).
     

  5. CONSTRUCT A PROTOTYPE: Draw a detailed specification of your best solution. Build a prototype from this specification.
     

  6. TEST & EVALUATE: Does it work? 

EARN POINTS

By completing the pre-race challenge, you will earn points towards the overall ​competition! After you're done completing the pre-race mission, fill out the form below to be entered into our live leaderboard!

How it works: each challenge throughout the Cyber Sled Race will be worth a certain value of points. After completing the challenge, simply fill out the leaderboard form letting us know you completed it. 

Created by the Buckeye Council, Boy Scouts of America

info@homescouting.org  |  2301 13th St NW, Canton, OH 44708