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BEAR DEN

WELCOME TO THE BEAR DEN

Welcome to the Bear Den! While each rank in Cub Scouting is referred to as a "den" as a group of people, a "den" is also a place that animals can retreat to and call home. This is your den for the HomeScouting Adventure Club for Bears! 

Bears are boys and girls in the third grade in fall of 2020. When you're ready, get started on your first HomeScouting Adventure!

Looking for last month's adventure? Click the Link Below!

NOVEMBER ADVENTURE:

PAWS FOR ACTION

This month's adventure is all about different ways of helping your community and country. You will learn about people who helped make America great and visit a place where history happened. You will learn how law enforcement officers keep your community safe and find out how you can support them. And you will discover ways you can help your community by conserving energy and doing cleanup projects. AScout is helpful, so let’s get started on the Paws for Action adventure!

Make sure to download the connected worksheet for this month's adventure!

THE AMERICAN FLAG

*required for adventure*

Requirement 1: Learn about our flag. Display it at home for one month. Say the Pledge of Allegiance and learn its meaning.

The United States flag is a very important symbol of our country. We respect the flag because it represents our country and those who have fought to protect it.

The flag was born on June 14, 1777. At first, it had 13 stars and 13 stripes for the 13 original states. As more states joined the United States, it changed many times. Now, the flag has 50 stars, representing the 50 states, and 13 stripes, representing the original states. Learn about the history of our different flags below. 

BRITISH RED ENSIGN

This ensign (another word for flag) flew over the American colonies before the American Revolution. It shows Great Britain’s Union Flag of 1606, which combines the crosses of St. George (for England) and St. Andrew (for Scotland).

GRAND UNION FLAG

George Washington flew this flag over his army headquarters near Boston, Massachusetts, in 1776, a year after the American Revolution began. This flag included 13 stripes representing the Thirteen Colonies.

 OLD GLORY

This is the first official flag of the United States. On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress decided that the flag should have 13 stripes like the Grand Union Flag, along with a union of “thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.” We celebrate June 14 as Flag Day each year

STAR SPANGLED BANNER

This flag includes 15 stripes and 15 stars because Vermont and Kentucky had joined the Union in the 1790s. It flew over Fort McHenry near Baltimore, Maryland, during the War of 1812 against Great Britain. Francis Scott Key watched it waving as the British bombarded the fort. Then he wrote our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

FLAG OF 1818

This flag has 20 stars but only 13 stripes. As more states joined the Union, people realized that the stripes were going to get too narrow. (Can you imagine 50 stripes on a flag?) Since 1818, all flags have included 13 stripes representing the Thirteen Colonies and one star for each state.

TODAY'S FLAG

Here’s the flag we use today. The most recent stars were added in 1959 (for Alaska) and 1960 (for Hawaii). This version of the flag has been in use longer than any other version in our history.

DISPLAYING THE FLAG

When the flag is displayed flat on a wall, the stars should

always be up and to the left (the flag’s right).

When the flag is on a stage, it should be on the speaker’s

right. When it is in the audience, it should be on the

audience’s right. When the flag is displayed with other flags

like state flags, it should be higher than them. When it is

flown with flags of other nations, all the flags should be at

the same height, but the United States flag should be on its

own right.

RAISING AND LOWERING THE UNITED STATES FLAG

It takes two people to raise and lower the flag correctly. The first person holds the flag. The second person attaches it to the halyard (rope) and raises it, keeping it close to the pole by holding the halyard tight. He then fastens the halyard to the cleat on the pole. (Make sure it’s snug so the flag stays at the top.)

The flag should be raised quickly in the morning and lowered slowly in the evening.

The guidelines for displaying the United States flag are part of something called the United States Code. You can learn more about it at www.usflag.org

The president, a governor, or the mayor of the District of Columbia can order the flag to be flown at half-staff on certain occasions, such as when a national leader dies. In the morning, the flag should be raised to full-staff and then lowered to half-staff. In the evening, it should be raised to full-staff before it is lowered.

FOLDING THE UNITED STATES FLAG

The United States flag is folded in a special way until only the blue field shows. First, fold the flag

lengthwise in half, then lengthwise again with the blue field on the outside. (It can help to have a

third person support the middle of the flag.) Next, make tight triangular folds, starting from the

striped end, until only the blue field is showing. Tuck in the loose end.

SHOWING RESPECT TO THE UNITED STATES FLAG

There are many rules about the flag, but the most important one is simple: Show respect. The flag represents our country and all the men and women who worked to make it great, so don’t treat it like an ordinary piece of cloth. Two ways you can show respect to the flag are by saluting it and flying it.

SALUTING THE FLAG: 

If you are in uniform, give the Cub Scout salute at these times:

  • When the flag is being raised or lowered.

  • When the flag passes by or when you pass the flag. In a parade, salute just before the flag passes and hold your salute until it has gone by.

  • When you recite the Pledge of Allegiance or sing “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

If you are not in uniform, greet the flag by taking off your hat and placing your right hand over your heart.

FLYING THE FLAG: 

The flag is flown on public buildings every day when weather permits. You can fly it at your home every day, too.

Some special days to fly the flag are:

  • New Year’s Day, January 1

  • Inauguration Day, January 20 in the year after a presidential election

  • Martin Luther King Jr. Day, third Monday in January

  • Lincoln’s Birthday, February 12

  • Washington’s Birthday or Presidents Day, third Monday in February

  • Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May

  • Memorial Day, last Monday in May (half-staff until noon, full-staff until sunset)

  • Flag Day, June 14

  • Independence Day, July 4

  • Labor Day, first Monday in September

  • Patriot Day, September 11

  • Constitution Day, September 17

  • Veterans Day, November 11

  • It is also flown on other days proclaimed by the president of the United States, on the birthdays of the states, and on state holidays.

RETIRING THE UNITED STATES FLAG

When a United States flag becomes worn beyond repair, it should be retired by burning it completely to ash. This should be done in a simple manner with dignity and respect. Your den or pack may do this as part of a ceremony, but your family could do this as well. Be very careful when retiring a flag so you don’t injure yourself, especially if the flag is made of synthetic material. Melting nylon can cause serious burns if you let it touch your skin.

THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

One way we show respect to the flag and our country is by reciting the Pledge of Allegiance: I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

What does the Pledge of Allegiance mean to you?

Did you know?

Despite what you may have heard, you don’t have to retire a United States flag if it accidentally touches the ground. In fact, it’s OK to clean or repair a flag that becomes dirty or torn.

Bears must complete at least two of the requirements below

FAMOUS AMERICANS

*two are required for adventure*

DO ONE OF THE FOLLOWING FOR REQUIREMENT 2:

  • Requirement 2A: Find out about two famous Americans. Share what you learned.

  • Requirement 2B: Find out where places of historical interest are located in or near your community, town, or city. Go and visit one of them with your family or den.

2A: Find out about two famous Americans. Share what you learned.

Our country didn’t just appear on Earth by magic. Men and women (and children!) worked over hundreds of years to create it. You have learned about some of these people in school. Here are some famous Americans. Study two of them or other Americans you respect.

Thomas Jefferson was the main author of the Declaration of Independence, which declared that the United States was now independent of Great Britain.

George Washington led the army that won the American Revolution and served as our first president.

Sequoyah was a Cherokee Indian who created a writing system for the Cherokee language

William Clark and Meriwether Lewis traveled from St. Louis, Missouri, to the Pacific Ocean to explore the Louisiana Purchase for President Jefferson.

  •  

Wilbur and Orville Wright built the first successful airplane.

  •  

Susan B. Anthony worked tirelessly to help women get the right to vote.

Thomas Edison invented light bulbs, movie cameras, X-ray machines, and much more.

Clara Barton created the American Red Cross to help people hurt by wars and natural disasters.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Christian minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement.

  •  

Rosa Parks helped start the civil rights movement by refusing to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama

  •  

Jimmy Carter served as president and later became famous for promoting peace, supporting human rights, and working to end suffering around the world.

  •  

Charles McGee, an Eagle Scout, was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen and flew more than 400 missions during three wars

  •  

Neil Armstrong, an Eagle Scout, was the first human being to stand on the moon.

  •  

You can find information about famous Americans in your school or local library, in school textbooks, in social studies class, or on the Internet with the help of an adult. Try to find out at least one fact that nobody knows.

Then share what you learned with your den or family. There are lots of ways to do this:

  • Write a skit for your den to perform.

  • Do a solo performance dressed as your character.

  • Make a poster showing important things about the person.

  • Create a movie on the computer.

  • Make a true-false quiz.

  • Play a guessing game using facts about the person.

2B: Find out where places of historical interest are located in or near your community, town, or city. Go and visit one of them with your family or den.

History is all around us. Learn about and visit a place of historical interest near where

you live. This might be the site of an important battle, the place where an exciting

discovery happened that is still helping people today, or the home or school of a

famous American. Important events might have happened there hundreds of years

ago or even since you were born.

Take along a camera, notebook, or sketchbook to record your visit.

Afterward, share what you learned with other people.

EMERGENCIES

*two are required for adventure*

DO TWO OF THE FOLLOWING FOR REQUIREMENT 3:

  • Requirement 3A: Visit a local sheriff’s office or police station, or talk with a law enforcement officer visiting your den. During the visit, take turns with your den members asking questions that will help you learn how to stay safe.

  • Requirement 3B: Make a list of emergency numbers and discuss with your family where the list should be kept. Show your family that you know how to call for help in an emergency. Talk with your family about people who could help you if a parent is not available. 

  • Requirement 3C: With your family, develop a plan to follow in case of an emergency and practice the plan at least three times. Your family can determine the emergency, or you can develop several plans.

3A: Visit a local sheriff’s office or police station, or talk with a law enforcement officer visiting your den. During the visit, take turns with your den members asking questions that will help you learn how to stay safe.

Just like a mother bear takes care of her cubs, the adults in your family help keep you safe. There are also people in your community whose job is to keep you and your family safe, even if it means putting their own lives in danger. That’s what law enforcement officers do every day to help your community. Visit with a law enforcement officer at a den meeting or at a local sheriff’s office or police station. Learn more about what he or she does and how you can help keep your family and community safe.

Before your visit, think of some questions you could ask. Here are some examples:

  • What are some things law enforcement officers do to keep our community safe?

  • How do law enforcement officers collect evidence of crimes?

  • How realistic are TV shows, movies, and books about crime?

  • How can I help prevent crime in my neighborhood?

  • How do I get help in an emergency?

  • What phone numbers should I call to get help?

  • What should I do if someone I know is being a bully?

 

3B: Make a list of emergency numbers and discuss with your family where the list should be kept. Show your family that you know how to call for help in an emergency. Talk with your family about people who could help you if a parent is not available. 

On your connected worksheet is a sample list of numbers and where to find them!

3C: ​With your family, develop a plan to follow in case of an emergency and practice the plan at least three times. Your family can determine the emergency, or you can develop several plans.

Emergencies can come in many different forms. Earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, fires, floods, medical emergencies, and lost pets or family members are all examples. To be ready for different types of emergencies, you may need different types of plans and resources. Ask your family members to help you consider what each plan requires. Planning beforehand helps you "BE PREPARED" as all good Scouts should be. 

DO A GOOD TURN

*two are required for adventure*

DO ONE OF THE FOLLOWING FOR REQUIREMENT 4:

  • Requirement 4A: Do a cleanup project that benefits your community.

  • Requirement 4B: Participate in a patriotic community parade or other civic event that honors our country. 

4A: Do a cleanup project that benefits your community.

 

Cleaning up after ourselves is something we all should do. However, you have probably noticed that not everyone remembers to do that. Sometimes you will see an empty lot where people have dumped trash or where weeds have grown tall. As you travel, you may see trash along the roadside. As a Bear Scout, you can help your community take care of these problems. This is another good way to show pride in your community. By giving your time, you can make a big difference. With your family or den, discuss a cleanup project you can perform as a group. Plan your project in your connected worksheet. Then go do it!

4B: Participate in a patriotic community parade or other civic event that honors our country. 

 

 

PAWS FOR ACTION

DEN ADVENTURE VIDEO  

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